Oh Henry! Stuffed Tomatoes

March 11, 2011 at 9:15 am 4 comments

I have been trying to track down the 1926 Oh Henry! candy bar cook book for a while now. It’s called 60 New Ways to Serve a Famous Candy Bar: 60 recipes for delicious cookery with Oh Henry! I just have to find it.

I got close when I stumbled on Jennifer Tribe’s blog Yesterday’s Clues. She collects paper ephemera. She recently posted a 1926 ad from Ladies Home Journal extolling the cook book and giving a recipe for fruit salad with shredded candy bar mixed in. Check out her blog and the ad here.

Now I found the next-best-thing to the motherlode. The late Ray Broekel, famous candy bar enthusiast, collected wrappers and other candy related ephemera. I got a copy of his 1985 book The Chocolate Chronicles just yesterday, and there it is, the introduction and almost 20 of the recipes and images. Yahoo!

For your delectation, I propose: Oh Henry! Stuffed Tomatoes

2 bars Oh Henry!

3 medium size tomatoes

2 tablespoons mayonnaise

salt

lettuce

Cut the Oh Henry! into small pieces. Remove the skins from the tomatoes, cut a slice from the top of each and carefully hollow out the centers. Dice these, drain off all the liquid, add the Oh Henry!, blend with the mayonnaise and salt, and use to refill the tomato shells. Chill and serve on lettuce.

Will you dare try the recipe? Maybe I’ll whip some up for lunch this weekend and enjoy it with a nice mug of hot Coca Cola.

 

 

Entry filed under: Uncategorized.

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4 Comments Add your own

  • 1. jillian  |  March 12, 2011 at 10:15 am

    Wow. I like candy a lot but that is really not OK. haha!

    Reply
  • 2. David  |  March 12, 2011 at 12:56 pm

    At last I have found the perfect accompaniment to that circus peanut salad!

    Reply
  • 3. Patti  |  March 13, 2011 at 5:42 pm

    This is fantastic. OMG, I want to make it and force my friends to eat it.

    Reply
  • 4. Sparkina  |  September 29, 2011 at 5:21 pm

    My face is turning green

    Reply

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Candy: A Century of Panic and Pleasure

Welcome to Candy Professor

Candy in American Culture What is it about candy? Here you'll find the forgotten, the strange, the curious, the surprising. Our candy story, one post at a time.

(C) Samira Kawash

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