Posts tagged ‘TV’

Howdy Doody, brought to you by Candy

“The auto took American families out of their homes…Television put them back on the sofa!”

In 1950, it was all about television. Anyone who wanted to sell anything to anybody could see that from here on out, TV was it.

Candy wanted in. In 1948, the candy manufacturer Mason, Au and Magenheimer experimented with sponsorship of a little program called “The Howdy Doody Show.” Within six weeks, its brand new “Mason Bar” was being promoted by 90 percent of the distributors in the market. Others quickly followed suit. By 1950, the “Candy and Soft Drink” category was second only to “Food and Food Products” in total network advertisements.

Candy companies sponsored many of America’s favorite early TV shows:

Peter, Paul Inc. sponsored Buck Rogers

Mars, Inc. sponsored Howdy Doody

Bunte Bros. sponsored Cactus Jim

M&M Ltd. sponsored  Super Circus

S.F. Whitman & Sons sponsored Show of Shows

Philadelphia Chewing Gum Corp. sponsored Mr. Magic

Doran Confectionery Co. sponsored Unk’n Andy

Gold Medal Candy Corp. sponsored Magic Clown

Walter Johnson Candy Co. sponsored Captain Video

Quaker City Chocolate & Confectionery Co. sponsored Lucky Pup

One advertising executive offered a note of caution to the sudden enthusiasm of the candy trade:

The candy business, never before particularly noted for a desire to spend more than a bare buck or two in advertising, has suddenly begun behaving like Diamond Jim Brady having a big evening at Rectors! But take it easy, gentlemen, even Diamond Jim must have occasionally felt a little dull the morning after. Not that TV isn’t all we say it is, –because it is and then some. It’s just that if you don’t know what you’re getting into, or you don’t hire someone who does,– then look out you don’t get your fingers all jammed up in this nice new toy.

Source: Franklyn W. Dyson, “Television and Candy—An Expert Tells Who, What, When, of Programming” Candy Industry 29 Aug. 1950

Related Posts:

  • Candy Discovers Television, 1950
  • A Musical TV Tribute to Candy, 1951
  • December 4, 2009 at 6:02 pm 2 comments

    A Musical TV Tribute to Candy, 1951

    By 1951, candy was fully committed to a television future. TV viewers on the night of December 1, 1951, enjoyed a full-length musical tribute to candy, as featured on the popular Ken Murray Television Show. There were specially written songs, special costumes and scenery, and a unique candy dance extravaganza.

    Family watching TV

    Viewers would be entertained, to be sure. But they would also be educated. The Candy Show was a promotion for candy, after all. The 14 million viewers learned about the important part candy plays in food and nutrition, the tireless efforts of candy manufacturers to improve their products, and the “constant efforts being put forth to provide the buying public with delicious and wholesome candy.”

    The Ken Murray Show’s sponsor probably had something to do with the plans for “one of the greatest good-will promotions in the entire history of the candy industry.” The sponsor was Anheuser-Busch. The Anheuser-Busch Corn Products Division was a major supplier of corn syrup to the candy industry (see CandyProfessor:  “Beer and Candy III”). So what was good for candy was good for corn products, and what was good for corn products was good for Anheuser-Busch.

    Source: “TV Show to Promote Candy as Food,” Confectioners Journal Dec. 1951, p. 27

    October 23, 2009 at 6:55 am 2 comments

    Candy Discovers Television, 1950

    In 1950, candy woke up to a whole new realm of candy selling and candy eating possibilities: television.

    Watching TV

    5 million television sets were in use in 1950, with another million expected to be added by years end. In the days of “family viewing,” that meant 15-20 million Americans gathered around the black and white hearth.

    But what really caught the candy industry’s eye was this: families gathered around the television were eating candy. Lots of it.

    TV was a perfect candy eating opportunity. TV created “a concentrated attentive audience, in a relaxed pleasure seeking mood. An audience that should be receptive to eating candy.”

    Marketing professionals had some advice for exploiting this new opportunity. Henceforth, candy manufacturers would

    1. sell the consumer on the idea of eating candy while watching television.

    2. create special television candies and packages

    3. investigate the potentials of television as an advertising medium for candy.

    The observations of a reporter for Candy Industry proved prophetic:

    As a new confectionery outlet it is still in infancy, if not the incubating stage. But it has taken root, and if properly developed, it may well have a terrific impact on the candy business in the months and years to come.

    Source: “Television Opens New Candy Market.” (p 1, 31) Candy Industry 25 April 1950, 1, 31.

    Related Posts:

  • Howdy Doody, brought to you by Candy
  • A Musical TV Tribute to Candy, 1951
  • October 21, 2009 at 5:03 pm 1 comment


    Candy: A Century of Panic and Pleasure

    Welcome to Candy Professor

    Candy in American Culture What is it about candy? Here you'll find the forgotten, the strange, the curious, the surprising. Our candy story, one post at a time.

    (C) Samira Kawash

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